Page 9 of 141 FirstFirst ... 45678910111213141959109 ... LastLast
Results 121 to 135 of 2108
  1. #121
    Dave J Guest

    Default

    Nothing major, but the son pulled apart his Nissan Navara 2wd rear brakes today to replace the pads and found one end of the adjuster fork was broken.
    He thought about going to the wreckers but was not sure if they would have one, or if they would separate it from the diff and didn't have time to run all over the place because he has to work tomorrow, so I offered to make one for him.
    It was one of those days when nothing was set up in the shop and took the best part of 45 minutes to make, but got him out of trouble quick and is stronger than the diecast looking original one. It would have taken him longer than 45 minutes to drive to and from the wreckers.

    It's time like this having a machine shop in the back yard pays off.
    I remember helping the daughter out on a weekend when she ran her car with out oil and seized the over head cam to the bearings and snapping the pulley dowel pin clean off. I took the cam out on the side of the road came home cleaned up the bearing surfaces, drilled out and replaced the dowel pin, then took it back with my drum sanding kit to clean up the bearings and installed it. It ran like that for 12 months until she got a new head.LOL

    Dave

  2. #122
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Collie,WA
    Age
    53
    Posts
    759

    Default

    Nice work Dave.
    I hope the Mrs knows how handy the machine shop was today...lol

    Sterob

  3. #123
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Perth WA
    Age
    65
    Posts
    5,917

    Default

    I remember helping the daughter out on a weekend when she ran her car with out oil and seized the over head cam to the bearings and snapping the pulley dowel pin clean off. I took the cam out on the side of the road came home cleaned up the bearing surfaces, drilled out and replaced the dowel pin, then took it back with my drum sanding kit to clean up the bearings and installed it. It ran like that for 12 months until she got a new head.LOL

    I just love it Dave ! Fantastic!

  4. #124
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    8,225

    Default

    Nice work Dave. So cool to be able to make a $0.20(not that you could actually get it for $0.20) part with $5k worth of machinery. Just a shame is wasn't the wife's car Dave. I was lucky enough to need a tiny pin to fix the ignition on swmbo car... I don't hear "What are you going to do with that?" so often now.

    I was going to add a picture of the box for my VSD, but as it isnt really metalwork as such I might put it in another thread.

    Stuart

  5. #125
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Athelstone, SA 5076
    Posts
    3,352

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sterob View Post
    Very nice work Eskimo!
    thanks Sterob

    and Dave,
    454 mins to make?...i'd still be there wondering how to do it...lol

  6. #126
    Dave J Guest

    Default

    Sterob,Stuart
    I have machined things for her, one thing that comes to mind is a new hand shower mount (made of die cast again) and a lot other things. It's the bigger things she wants done like the 4mtr x 2.5 mtr bird aviary, finish the kitchen, front fence, 3 x 900mm fish tanks in the hallway wall, put up new back fences, etc, etc, etc. LOL
    Not sure about $5000, I have the shed contents insured for $80,000 and even though I haven't fulfilled her to do list, she still encourages me and helps me buy more machines and every present has got tools in it, she almost bought me a surface grinder for christmas.
    The only thing she asks me is where are you going to put it? I wouldn't trade her for the world.

    Eskimo,
    Pretty easy, I started with a scrap piece of 20mm, drilled the center out to 10mm (using a 9.5mm drill because they cut over size) machined the outside to shape and cut it off in the band saw.
    Then over to the mill where I cut the flats it was 19mm and I needed it to be 5mm so it was just a matter of touching of the end mill on the top and machining down 7mm on each side. It was just held in the vice long ways and when I did the other side it was just eyed up as it didn't need to be perfect. To get the taper I just hung the piece out of one side of the vice and eyed up the angle with a bit of trial and error on each side.
    To get the slot I just marked it up and cut most of it out on the band saw then stood it vertical in the vice and took 1mm cuts with a 10mm end mill until I was at the right depth.
    A touch up with the file and it was all done. He drove into town last night and went to work today and all is fine for his first go at doing drum brakes, (with me over his shoulder).

    Bob, I have a few stories like that one I have don over the years.

    Dave

  7. #127
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    8,225

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave J View Post
    finish the kitchen,
    I hear that one all the time.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave J View Post
    Not sure about $5000, I have the shed contents insured for $80,000
    Well yeah but you didnt use them all

  8. #128
    Dave J Guest

    Default

    The only trouble with having all the tools for metal and wood work, brick laying concreting, spray painting, panel beating, etc, is that I am expected to do everything around the house and on the cars. The only trades men we get in is eleco's.
    My Granddad always says I have more tools than a trades man, because I have every trades tools.lol

    Dave

  9. #129
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Armidale NSW
    Age
    47
    Posts
    864

    Default Poor mans tool post grinder/slitting saw thingy

    Here is an old cast iron pipe (I scavenged from somewhere) that I used as the body. This stuff was very hard and when cutting and welding it smelled like creosote.


    The cut section. Wall thickness is not very consistent.


    This shows it mounted in the slitting position (without the grinder). In this position a thin cutoff disk is in line with the lathe centre. Note I stick welded with SS rods as I don't have any cast iron ones.


    Here is the grinding setup. Note the "holder" is now upside down.


    Showing the finish. From left the right, we have the lathe finish, 40 grit flap disk and then a 120 grit flap disk.
    Cheers.

    Vernon.
    __________________________________________________
    Bite off more than you can chew and then chew like crazy.

  10. #130
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Southern Highlands NSW
    Posts
    1,230

    Default

    In a hurry, I once used tyre inner tubes, cut into rings like big elastic bands. It held an angle grinder to the toolpost well enough to do a grinding job in a lathe.

    Jordan

  11. #131
    Dave J Guest

    Default

    Hi Vernon,
    The I am sure the rest of that pipe will come in handy as well, great find.
    The flap disc will be fine if your just wanting to put a finish on a piece but you wont be able to get anything to exact size because it will compress depending on the pressure put on it, a grinding disc will be better used on it's edge.

    Dave

  12. #132
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Age
    68
    Posts
    5,079

    Default

    I have a cheap chinese swivel vise, that has become a bit of a favorite for small odd jobs, it lives over near the wood working bench. I overtightened it once and cracked the cast iron where it meets the front jaw. After welding it up with cast iron rods, it kept going for many years, but eventually it recently cracked again, no doubt due to my crappy welding..

    I bored out the front jaw and turned down a section of the ram to fit, when it's all back together I will pin it with some brass shear pins, I'd rather just replace the shear pins than crack the cast iron.. (well, that's the theory anyway)...



    After boring for a while, the hole fills up with cast iron swarf, which I couldn't easily clean out..


    A small rare-earth magnet and a pair of pliers..



    I have a new year's resolution, not to use compressed air any more to clean off swarf, it just goes everywhere, and you end up with swarf hidden all over the place..instead I'm trying to use brush and vacuum.. and sometimes magnets...

    Now that the ram is shorter, I have to make up a spacer to fix up the length of the leadscrew. Then maybe some decent smooth jaws..


    Regards
    Ray

  13. #133
    Dave J Guest

    Default

    Nice save Ray,
    I use a dust pan and brush as well as a vacuum cleaner to pick up the chips. I find the canister type vacuums are great for swarf as they are easy to empty out not like a bag. I do use compressed air every now and then to clean the filter in the vacuum and makes it work like new again.

    Dave

  14. #134
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    near Rockhampton
    Posts
    5,580

    Default

    Here is some things I have made recently...

    A die holder for 25mm dies. A toolmakers clamp and a brazed carbide 60 degree threading cutter..

    I am pretty ordinary at knurling and this is no where near as good as the stuff I see others make on here

    clickable thumbnail



  15. #135
    Dave J Guest

    Default

    Some handy and nice tools work their RC. I was just given 2 tool makers clamps my Grandfather picked up somewhere, they are hand made as well but being rusty are no where near as nice as yours.

    Dave
    PS
    Are you going to post your vise up here for the guys to see your newly acquired skill?
    Fantastic work by the way. I will know who to ask questions when I get going.

Similar Threads

  1. latest little project
    By wayno60 in forum WELDING
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12th Jul 2008, 03:40 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •