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  1. #1
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    Default CNC in the 1950s interesting video

    Cheers, Joe
    almost completely retired - more time to contemplate projects and spend more shed time....

  2. #2
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    It is NC, no computer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pipeclay View Post
    It is NC, no computer.
    When they say "no computer" they are referring to the fact that there is not a "conventional" computer directly attached to and driving the machine.

    The machine is still computer driven.

    Google definition of "Computer"

    noun
    noun: computer; plural noun: computers
    an electronic device which is capable of receiving information (data) in a particular form and of performing a sequence of operations in accordance with a predetermined but variable set of procedural instructions (program) to produce a result in the form of information or signals.
    I suspect that CNC machines can be programmed in situ, whilst NC machines need to have the programs brought to them from outside. This does not change the "computer" definition, it just means one machine has more input options available. The first computer I "controlled" was physically many kilometers away. My control consisted of providing some input in the form of pencil marks on a series of cards. One card per character. The computer would have been programmed to accept this input via another series of cards, this time probably punched.

    I operated NC lathes and a mill (once only) during the late 70's and early 80's. The programming was done in an office and this program was transferred to the NC via a floppy disk. The machine then ran the program in order to machine parts. It had a computer inside the control panel.

    Back then computers were very expensive in comparison to the cost of the machine itself. It was a big cost saving to use only the minimal parts required to actually run the machine and provide the programming externally.

    Today, the cost of a very high end PC would be negligible compared to the cost of manufacturing a machine comparible to the one shown in the video. The Mill that I had a short run on back in the early 80's, was worth somewhere towards $200k. The company got it at half this price as a sort of prototype. Back then a mini computer was the basic minimal computer available for industry. One of these would cost a fair chunk of that $200k.

    Dean

  4. #4
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    The video is still not of a CNC but of an NC machine.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by pipeclay View Post
    The video is still not of a CNC but of an NC machine.
    True.

    Do you know what the specific difference is?

    Dean

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    Thanks for that Joe, very interesting as to what was available back then. Here's me thinking that it was the late 20th century invention.
    Dean, some people HAVE to be pedantic!!!!!!
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  7. #7
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    There is no computer and the machine has no memory, the tape controls the movements, the tape must be reloaded to cycle again.

    It works in a similar way to a Jacquard loom that dates to early 1800

    The next generation of machines used tape transfer the code and the machines had memory ( you ran the tape once to load the code and then could cycle multiple times with out reference to the tape)

  8. #8
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    @Pipeclay: why don't you make your protest know to the originator of the Youtube video instead of here?
    You and I clearly know the difference - the originators obviously don't. So there is no point to discussing it here....

    For what its worth, I saw my first tape operated machine tools in Germany when I was 12, 53 years ago. Significantly, one of the machines was a very large brige type planer. Very impressive at the time.
    Cheers, Joe
    almost completely retired - more time to contemplate projects and spend more shed time....

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by twopintsplease View Post
    There is no computer and the machine has no memory, the tape controls the movements, the tape must be reloaded to cycle again.

    It works in a similar way to a Jacquard loom that dates to early 1800

    The next generation of machines used tape transfer the code and the machines had memory ( you ran the tape once to load the code and then could cycle multiple times with out reference to the tape)
    What did the solid state electronic boards do then?

    Dean

  10. #10
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    Converts the hole in the paper tape to a signal for the servo motors
    Last edited by twopintsplease; 14th Aug 2016 at 09:32 PM. Reason: added paper to tape to clarify

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    Quote Originally Posted by jhovel View Post
    @Pipeclay: why don't you make your protest know to the originator of the Youtube video instead of here?
    You and I clearly know the difference - the originators obviously don't. So there is no point to discussing it here....

    For what its worth, I saw my first tape operated machine tools in Germany when I was 12, 53 years ago. Significantly, one of the machines was a very large brige type planer. Very impressive at the time.
    So you just pasted the heading to your thread rather than writing it yourself.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by twopintsplease View Post
    Converts the hole in the paper tape to a signal for the servo motors
    Thanks.

    Technically that still constitutes a computer as per the definition, but not as most people would understand one.

    The first computer design was intended to operate on steam. It was not completed, but the design was considered viable.

    Dean

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    Quote Originally Posted by pipeclay View Post
    So you just pasted the heading to your thread rather than writing it yourself.
    Yep. Guilty as charged, Sirrrr!
    Cheers, Joe
    almost completely retired - more time to contemplate projects and spend more shed time....

  14. #14
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    Great video. I never realised 5 axis had been around for so long. Was there ever 5 axis full manual machines?

    There's an video on YouTube about the Repco Brabham F1 days which shows a few ticker tape lathes and mills.

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

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    Anyone interested in "computers" by some definitions - ahem - try looking at the Antikythera machine from 2300 years ago, probably designed by Archimedes. Pity he was murdered by the Romans. We might be 2000 years further down the track with technology,....
    Or you could start here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZXjUqLMgxM
    Cheers, Joe
    almost completely retired - more time to contemplate projects and spend more shed time....

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