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  1. #121
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Melbourne
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    Not alof of time in the shed lately but did some more on that part.

    I used the mill in question to bore the 16mm hole. I used the auto quill feed set at 0.04mm per rev and it produced a finish i have never attained before on a mill!

    Im loving the features on this mill. The auto trip function also works both down and now up after the last part was added.

    However without a quill dro i am forced to use the knee hand wheel for setting the correct depth for milling which is a little clumbsy. I have read that many people with bridgeport style mills always use the knee to set depth but for small variations i cant see why the quill cant be used.



    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  2. #122
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    2,041

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    Hi Simon,

    However without a quill dro i am forced to use the knee hand wheel for setting the correct depth for milling which is a little clumbsy. I have read that many people with bridgeport style mills always use the knee to set depth but for small variations i cant see why the quill cant be used.
    Using the knee is standard practice on that type of mill ! Many people fit a dial gauge to the head in order to make accurate movements of the quill. Just make sure to lock the quill before cutting. For what its worth, I used the head to set a zero and then use the quill to set depth. The quill moves enough when locking to give me a couple of tenths of a mm deeper cut.
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  3. #123
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
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    3,843

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    Thanks Baron, reading many posts on mant different forums it does appear as though many machinists in their day were taught to use the knee instead of the quill. I can't see using the quill for my hobby to be too much of an issue but I guess it depends on what and how deeper cuts you take and on other circumstances. I have always locked the quill when not in use. I learnt that early on with my Chinese mill because it was a tad loose when left untightened.

    I have also finished my mill part, the clutch dog carrier or whatever you want to call it. It was alot of work and it's my first part I have ever had to copy so it was a fun experience. I must say, I'm overall pretty happy with the result, in fact it works better than the old part when it was working!

    Like I said earlier, the old part had a couple of adjustment shims which were pretty much cactus. I changed the dimensions to allow for the shims in the new part so it no longer needs them. Worked a treat. You can see signs of where I have had to machine a radius on the RT using two passes because of the nature of the part but with a light sanding with wet/dry and painted, you won't really notice it. You will also notice that some of the non-critical dimensions I have made heavier. Since it was made from a block of aluminium, I didn't see any point machining off more than necessary just to make the part look exactly the same. The little lobes that hold the pin for the lever, for example are made heavier, since aluminium is a softer material. Same same with the wall thickness of the shaft that holds the horizontal clutch.

    Cheers

    Simon
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  4. #124
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    205

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    Great job Simon
    Much better than buying one

    Pete

  5. #125
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Ballarat
    Age
    60
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    3,041

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    Nice bit of work there Simon

    Phil

  6. #126
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

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    Yep, very nice job!

    Ray

  7. #127
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    Aug 2011
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    Melbourne
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    Thanks for the kind words guys.

    What has been a real eye opener for me using this mill is the fact that even a well worn machine whose ways are so worn i had to shim the gibb strips and then limit the table and saddle travel so it did not bind once adjusted in the centre, it is still capable of a superior finish and holds better accuracy (albeit on a reduced work envelope) than my Chinese gear head mill that was new to me. I shouldnt have been so hesitant to buy a S/H machine in the first place because even a flogged machine can produce good results if you work within its limitations, which is what you have to do with brand new Chinese machines anyway!

    Next up will be the quill fine feed handwheel and quill feed handle. That will conclude my work on the head.... oh no i wont, i have a quill dro to add too.

    Simon

    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  8. #128
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    129

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    Quote Originally Posted by simonl View Post
    Thanks for the kind words guys.

    What has been a real eye opener for me using this mill is the fact that even a well worn machine whose ways are so worn i had to shim the gibb strips and then limit the table and saddle travel so it did not bind once adjusted in the centre, it is still capable of a superior finish and holds better accuracy (albeit on a reduced work envelope) than my Chinese gear head mill that was new to me. I shouldnt have been so hesitant to buy a S/H machine in the first place because even a flogged machine can produce good results if you work within its limitations, which is what you have to do with brand new Chinese machines anyway!

    Next up will be the quill fine feed handwheel and quill feed handle. That will conclude my work on the head.... oh no i wont, i have a quill dro to add too.

    Simon

    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
    Yes i agree i had a chinese lathe and gear head mill both of them were good to use but they had there limitations. I now own s/h lathe and mill which are 50 years old and have there share amount of wear and tear on them. I'm getting very good results from the lathe and once i get the mill up and running i think the same can be said about the mill.

  9. #129
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    2,041

    Thumbs up

    Hi Simon,

    I can only echo the words of the other guys, fine work there. As you mention, a coat of paint and no one would ever know
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  10. #130
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Healesville
    Posts
    1,102

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    Hey Simon nice job m8, how did you mill that radius?
    Did you mount the part to an angle plate on the RT?
    cheers, shed

  11. #131
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    Aug 2011
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    Melbourne
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    Thanks shed. There were 3 radii done on the RT. I mounted it directly onto the RT, I had thought of using an angle plate but after playing around, it just seemed easier this way. One of the keys to making this part was to carefully choose the order of operations so as to allow succesful work holding all the way through. The lobe for the pin of the lever was done first in the RT, then the radius for the larger horizontal shaft for the sliding clutch. This part had to be done in several operations and the part had to be flipped over to do both ends. Clamping always seemed to get in the way so I had to do part of the radius, then add another clamp, and remove the last and continue. Being aluminium, cutting forces were low with small DOC and so I got away with a single clamp at each point. Last part was the radius for the top, that was the easiest.

    It would have been alot more difficult in steel, and even more difficult using that initial piece of medium carbon steel I had as the cutting forces would have made clamping more difficult.

    Simon
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  12. #132
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Perth WA
    Age
    66
    Posts
    6,100

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    It certainly looks the part Simon, well done. Well worth your perseverance with the rotary table and associated painstaking clamping.

    BT

  13. #133
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    Aug 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
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    Thanks Bob.
    I forgot to mention, it cost me a 6mm endmill which i broke while milling between the lobes to the shaft bore.

    Not sure what i was doing wrong but each pass saw aluminium clog the cutting edges and before i picked up on this i broke the endmill. After this i had to clean in between the flutes after each pass. Not sure if this is normal i tried different speeds and feeds. I didnt use coolant or air, that may have helped.

    Simon

    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  14. #134
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    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
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    Hi Simon,

    When machining alloys, I use WD40 or wax, it helps to prevent pickup on the flutes. The wax by the way works better on saw blades, circular or vertical bandsaw.
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  15. #135
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
    Age
    66
    Posts
    3,550

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    Candle wax on the thin cutting discs works well for cutting aluminium also.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

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