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  1. #61
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
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    65
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    2,782

    Default

    Any chance of a photo/s of the oil thrower please?
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    near Warragul, Victoria
    Posts
    3,140

    Default Thrower

    Quote Originally Posted by KBs PensNmore View Post
    Any chance of a photo/s of the oil thrower please? Kryn
    hi Kryn Will take a pic tomorrow, the oil thrower appears to be non-removable .

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    near Warragul, Victoria
    Posts
    3,140

    Default more

    I just received an email from the UK. The message tells me: the oil thrower comes off ! With so much oil and grime its difficult for me to see whats going on. Anyway I will proceed . Edit: I took this pic a few days ago
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  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    near Warragul, Victoria
    Posts
    3,140

    Default oil thrower

    I removed the crankshaft today. The oil thrower was not a problem after all , I heated it up and it fell off ! After the thrower cooled down it would not fit back on, a shrink fit it is. Anyway the block is ready to be taken to a engine builder to be hot dipped, bored and hard exhaust seats installed . Does anybody know of a good engine rebuilder business this side of Melbourne, experienced with vintage stuff ? Most of the old rebuilders who knew the ins and outs have retired , and I don't want to end up with a badly machined block.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    near Warragul, Victoria
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    3,140

    Default

    The second engine block ( first one no good ) is still at the engine machining place for a rebore, its been there for over 2 months . I tried asking when it will be done but they are stalling. Got to be careful not to upset them but it may go on for ages. I will give it another few weeks and go and get it and try somewhere else

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    near Warragul, Victoria
    Posts
    3,140

    Default shock

    Just got a big shock. The guy from the engine place range me, the Morris engine block is ready to be picked up . The charge is $1675 ..this for dip cleaning , boring and surfacing a 6 cyl. engine block . And surfacing the head . Bloody hell ! Are these high charges normal these days ? Seems a rippoff to me but I've never had a block bored before . whinge whinge

  7. #67
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
    Age
    65
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    2,782

    Default

    Hi Mike, don't forget that most businesses charge around $100+ per hour for labour and machine. That cost would have included the other engine block that you took for repair, but wasn't suitable, then you've Grab Snatch and Take (GST) on top of it all. The block would have been in the dip for 2-3 hours at least, the boring could go for an hour per cylinder, including honing, there is a bit of set up time involved. The head could be another hour + depending on type of machine.
    What was wrong with the other block, the cost there, could be if they had bored 5 cylinders and found the 6th one stuffed.
    Did you ask for a quote?
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    near Warragul, Victoria
    Posts
    3,140

    Default

    Hi Kryn The first block I took to him has very worn bores and he said it needed to be bored to +40 thou, problem is I only have new +20 pistons so that killed off that block, but he did resurface the deck of that block. The second block I took to him , he has bored and honed to +20 thou and decked the top and also resurfaced the head . Yes I know they charge 100 bucks an hour but it still seems excessive to me . Yes you are correct , he told me the charges include the work on the first block . I could have taken the head to my friendly toolmaker in Drouin who does my mill tables for me for 100 bucks, he's got a massive surface grinder . I was tossing up if I should get the head resurfaced as it was not too bad condition, but as I was having the block done I thought I might as well do the head too. No didn't get a quote........ my mistake, but even with a quote would it have made any difference . I won't be going back to him that's for sure, I reckon about 800-900 would have been fair .

  9. #69
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
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    65
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    Default

    As a comparison ring around to other engine reconditioners and ask what the cost would be to do what you had done? If the prices are similar, with in a hundred, you'll know it's about right, but if it a lot different, I'd complain and see if you could get a refund.
    With a quote, by law it cannot be varied, unless you ask for extra work to be done, and you'd have been aware of the cost.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    near Warragul, Victoria
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    3,140

    Default cracks

    Bugger, found two short cracks in the block,either side of a stud hole . Maybe some loctite on the stud will seal it ?
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  11. #71
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
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    65
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    Default

    Hi Mike, That's a real bugger, it's a wonder the engine reconditioner didn't say something, if it stuck out like that. I know someone who had a similar problem. What they did was, drill and tap a hole along the crack,starting at one end, screwed in a bolt, then cut the head off and did the same again on the edge of the screwed in bolt, and repeated the operations until the crack was filled with bolts. There is a name for this process, but it's beyond my memory ATM.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    near Warragul, Victoria
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    Default

    Hi Kryn It could turn into a disaster if I try to drill into the crack . I am inclined to leave it alone and hope for the best . Ive also discovered the block has had a poor cleanout , it isn't any cleaner inside than when I dropped it off at his place ! If he did actually dip it into a bath, it was a very weak solution in the bath because it had no effect as far as I can see. I did a online search for engine boring costs and it is clearly apparent that I was overcharged by this rippoff merchant.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
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    65
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    Default

    Why do you think it'll turn into a disaster??? The block I was referring to was a 1948 International, it had a crack on the outside of the block into the water jacket, and is still holding after 5 years.
    The process is called Metal Stitching and I found a link for it.
    https://www.metalock.co.uk/typical-o...stitching.aspx
    It would be a better fix than a Locktite fix, IMHO.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Melbourne
    Age
    29
    Posts
    278

    Default

    I wish i had a penetrating dye crack detection kit because its always useful to know the depth. I can second the metal stitching technique i used it on a mazda 1300 block and it lasted many years. May even still be going. At least you have a dud block to practice on.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    63

    Default

    Looking at your problem, I would not think metal stitching is the best solution. It works well where a crack is surrounded by metal, such as in an outside water-jacket, but in the situation you have, this process is more likely to place additional stress on the cracked webs in the block, leading to a possible catastrophe. The cracks probably don't go deeper than the bottom of the stud hole at present, and were likely caused by over-tightening of that particular stud when it was originally installed. I am sure the engine has run successfully for a long time since then.
    My suggestion is to use Loctite 243 on that particular stud when you re-assemble the engine, taking care that there is no excess in the hole to cause the stud to "hydraulic", and do not over-tighten. Loctite 243 is able to tolerate oil, and seal against water.
    Another possible? solution is GM Sealing Compound P/N 3835215 which was used on Holden motors some years ago to seal head bolt threads where they screwed directly through to the water jacket.

    Chas.

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