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Thread: Old Walther GSP

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    south coast Australia
    Posts
    27

    Default Old Walther GSP

    Hi guys,
    I have an old Walther GSP that I purchased about 4 years ago after a long break from shooting. This trusty old handgun has been around our club probably since it was new, (about 40 years ago) had untold rounds through it, (I have put between 15 to 20 thousand through it in four years) and probably shoots as good as the day it came out of the factory.

    Problem is it has had so many rounds through it, all the screws (including sight, handle, trigger sear adjustment) all do their own thing and start to wind out during a match.

    LOCTITE I hear you cry. Problem is, it is a tricky line between not working, and working so well you can no longer move some of those tiny slotted head ones like the sear adjustment. I don't want to replace the old faithful as yet, never let me down once, and it can still shoot fly- off pepper.

    Need some advice as to the best thread lockers that will work in this situation, because it is getting embarrassing with all the guys taking the out of me making constant adjustments at half time, and keeping the old girl running.

    Bruce

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Mackay Qld
    Posts
    4,061

    Default

    How far away is a real gunsmith?

    I have a friend who did this work and from conversations we have had, I gather more harm is done by people who apply inappropriate repairs than not.

    It is amazing just how small things make a difference. I have recently witnessed him fix a muzzle loader that was a tack driver in its day and now keyholes the same slug.

    He worked out that the cast lead slugs had age hardened 10-15 yrs since casting. He has a little doover that that checks lead hardness. I saw the same rifle shot 10x s with newly cast slugs.

    That's an example to highlight what I wrote above. I know by perusing some of the gun catalogs that over size taps and screw are used to fix some loose thread problems and permanent effective repair may be more than Loctite.

    Cheers
    Grahame

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Burnie/ Adelaide
    Age
    53
    Posts
    4,525

    Default

    Graham's question is a good one - what is your location more exactly than south coast Australia?
    If you are anywhere near Adelaide I can give you a contact number for a gunsmith - he may be able to help.

    Michael

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    south coast Australia
    Posts
    27

    Default

    I probably would find someone in Canberra (I'm on the south coast NSW near Narooma) but the problem is I might just have to face the fact that it gets to a point where it is not worth spending a lot of dosh to keep it running. The trigger mechanism of the latest GSP will slot straight in, but the cost of that mechanism would go a fair way to purchasing a new gun.

    I certainly take your point, and don't want to aggrevate the situation futher, but I guess there comes a time when you have start weighing up the cost of keeping the old one running, as opposed to putting the money towards a new one.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    28

    Default

    I have used contact adhesive as a weak thread locker
    Ken

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    51

    Default

    How often do you need to set the sear? For my needs I would go for Purple Loctite for stuff you will want to move frequently without it falling out every time you use the thing, Blue for stuff you want to keep in place and maybe adjust/tighten a couple of times a year and Red for the "permanently" tightened/adjusted screws. Try without the primers first.

    Sometimes even a bit of waxed dental floss or a very thin strip of plumbers tape works wonders.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    south coast Australia
    Posts
    27

    Default

    I do a quick readjustment after 30 shots at half time, (most ISSF handgun comps are shot over 60 rounds) and you can feel the pull starting to get heavier after about 20. For those not familiar, the trigger pull weight in most events is set at 1 kilo, and even slight deviation during a match can be quite off putting. Some events there is no minium pull weight, and the guns are tested prior (unloaded) by holding vertical by the barrel, bumping the grip, and if it doest't release it's passed.

    I think the right grade locktite will keep it going for a bit, as once set, it shouldnt need adjusting. I just didn't want to put a thread locker on that was going to permanently bond it in place, because if you get it wrong, then you're a "shot duck" so as to speak. Watching my dosh a bit at the moment, and for a replacement you don't get much change out of $3000, and once you have had a gun of that standard (even if old) there is no going back to a cheaper alternative.

    Thanks to all you good folk who have had an input.

    Bruce

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    3,261

    Default

    something wrong if they keep coming loose.
    If you need the name of one of the best walther gunsmith in aus PM me....he resides in Adelaide tho, but is in Darwin till next week..

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Kimberley, West Australia
    Posts
    175

    Default

    Hello Bruce,
    Know how you feel about that great old gun. They just go on forever! Suggest you clean the threads with some white spirit or acetone and then apply a tiny touch of Loctite 222 with the end of a toothpick etc. Should stiffen them enough to stop movement but allow adjustment a number of times. Used some on the trigger stop of my Margolin/Vostok and several other pistols and am happy with the result. Good shooting!
    Combustor.
    Old iron in the Outback, Kimberley WA.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lebrina
    Posts
    1,206

    Default

    Loctite 290 could well be worth a look as it is designed to be used on pre assembled threads such as instrumentation and carburetors and wicks into the threads by capillary action.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Waikanae, New Zealand
    Age
    73
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Can you measure the relevant screws, and determine whether the wear is predominantly on the screw, or whether the tapped threads are more worn? It is possible that new screws, along with purple Loctite, could bail you out The trigger screw could possibly benefit from a stronger grade, as it should not need to be adusted, except very infrequently. If it comes to the worst, many grades of Loctite can be released by combining heat (greater than 290C) with tool pressure.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    South Australia
    Age
    32
    Posts
    272

    Default

    an old trick is to put a dab of clear nail polish on the threads of rifle and pistol fasteners that have a habit of working themselves loose in operation, the bond can be easily broken with a bit of force or a drop of acetone. for some things LOCTITE is a bit overkill, and overpriced.

    Ben

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