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Thread: Foundry Myths

  1. #1
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    Default Foundry Myths

    Hi All,

    I found this video very informative...

    Foundry myths - YouTube

    Not that I'd be all that keen to repeat the experiments...

    There are a number of good videos by the same guy

    luckygen1001's channel - YouTube

    Regards
    Ray

    PS. I think he's somewhere down Gippsland way.

  2. #2
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    Default

    Would like to have seen the experiments done with cast iron rather then aluminium....
    Gold, the colour of choice for the discerning person.

  3. #3
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    Default

    I know this video.
    But as soon as the water gets below the molten metal's surface, the fun is over.
    I spilled half a crucible of aluminium in 0.1 seconds that way.


    Nick

  4. #4
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    Default Foundry explosions

    When I was an apprentice back in the 60s there was an explosion at Ultimo Tech when the Patternmakers where doing some casting. The sand was too wet and as a result the apprentice 2 years my senior copped metal in his leg.
    I recently did the night TAFE foundry course at the 'gong where after showing you how to, it was open slather on doing your own projects.I had just made the pattern for a plaque for a navy LST and thought I would prove it using scrap brass plumbing taps etc for the melt. There was no way they would put my scrap in the pot because of the risk of water in the tap chambers.
    So whilst good entertainment the video is very dangerous for all the amateurs out there.
    The TAFE had been set up by BHP but they never put anyone thru it.
    It survived for a while on car restorers and steam nuts and sculptures etc.
    They had a great furnace it would melt cast iron in 20 minutes but you could only pour what 2 people could lift. Much better than the old cupola we used at the Ballina slip where we used wine flagons for flux.
    H.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by clear out View Post
    It survived for a while on car restorers and steam nuts and sculptures etc.
    Steam nuts?? ouch.

    Head nut Phil

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steamwhisperer View Post
    Steam nuts?? ouch.

    Head nut Phil
    Sorry about that. I am obviously not at all nuts.
    Just in from the shed where I'm restoring a 3 wheel Mazda ute.
    Also a timber framed convertable (Morgan).
    Ive even kept 20ft of line shafting in the roof.
    Have a Buzacott to hook up to it 'one day' but would love a small steam engine.
    H.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by .RC. View Post
    Would like to have seen the experiments done with cast iron rather then aluminium....
    Hi .RC.

    Still not sure I'd be game enough to try, but here's the cast iron version Foundry myths revisited - YouTube

    Regards
    Ray

  8. #8
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    Default Big girls in runners

    How would these turkeys go if the plug didn't stop the pour from the cupola and they had to run through an inch of molten iron on the foundry floor to try and stop it all from covering the entire foundry.
    Ballina Slipway and Engineering 1975.
    We had a 'few beers' at the "Pot" after that one
    SG was also using the black zircon sand for blasting in the boiler shop
    To say nothing of the welding leads the fork used to run over.
    Maybe the Chinese or Indians will see this and think it's a safety film.
    H.

  9. #9
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by clear out View Post
    When I was an apprentice back in the 60s there was an explosion at Ultimo Tech when the Patternmakers where doing some casting. The sand was too wet and as a result the apprentice 2 years my senior copped metal in his leg.
    I recently did the night TAFE foundry course at the 'gong where after showing you how to, it was open slather on doing your own projects.I had just made the pattern for a plaque for a navy LST and thought I would prove it using scrap brass plumbing taps etc for the melt. There was no way they would put my scrap in the pot because of the risk of water in the tap chambers.
    .
    I realise this is an old thread but am wondering if anyone else has done this.
    What about if the taps are dismantled and then heated in a forge before being melted?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    I realise this is an old thread but am wondering if anyone else has done this.
    What about if the taps are dismantled and then heated in a forge before being melted?
    shouldnt be a problem....but what if some wet was accidently mixed with dry?

    Even galvanising companies will not hot dip hollow tube unless there is a hole in each section

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