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Thread: Brazing Torch?

  1. #1
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    Default Brazing Torch?

    What are the options for a brazing torch for simple hobby and small repair applications

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    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    I occasionally use a small butane torch but it can only be used for very small tasks.
    By small I mean wires, small rods or very thin sheet.
    The problem with small butane torches is not the temperature but that they simply don't generate enough heat (calories) needed to heat up and keep larger pieces hot enough for long enough for the brazing wire to melt and flow.

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    I have a Bernzomatic TS8000 but it seems not quite hot enough to braze bronze rods correctly, I can melt the rod with the flame but I know that is not correct way to braze. For what I'm doing it seems to work but I would like to braze correctly, don't want to get the oxy setup.

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    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken_Metal_Work View Post
    I have a Bernzomatic TS8000 but it seems not quite hot enough to braze bronze rods correctly, I can melt the rod with the flame but I know that is not correct way to braze. For what I'm doing it seems to work but I would like to braze correctly, don't want to get the oxy setup.
    Yeah I have never had much luck with those torches either.

    Can you describe exactly what you're doing , starting from how you clean things, flux.
    Photographs of the joint showing all the pieces being joined prior to applying heat would help
    What type and size of brazing rods are you using.
    What size are the bronze rods?

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    I'm using Bernzomatic WB5 Bronze Flux Coated Brazing Rod 1/8", I've actually now finished the job but only by melting the rod with the torch onto the joint, it seems to have worked pretty well. But even though the steel appeared to be red/white hot the rods don't melt on contact.

    So I really want to braze correctly in the future but it seems that the Bernzomatic TS8000 torch does not quite have enough heat, so I was really looking for other torch suggestions, I don't want to get an oxy-acetylene setup for what I'm doing.

  6. #6
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    I gave up years ago playing around with Berznomatic and the like for brazing, it is just a frustrating waste of time, you may find that a silver solder will do what you require

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken_Metal_Work View Post
    I have a Bernzomatic TS8000 but it seems not quite hot enough to braze bronze rods correctly, I can melt the rod with the flame but I know that is not correct way to braze. For what I'm doing it seems to work but I would like to braze correctly, don't want to get the oxy setup.
    Soldering and brazing are essentially the same process, the difference being in the melting temperature of the filler metals.
    It is nothing at all to do with welding as in that process both parent metal and filler metals are fused together.

    Soldering/brazing is more akin to a bonding process where the liquid filler flows over the red hot parent metal and adheres into the microscopic pores and adheres or mechanically locks into them when it cools.

    This is why the parent metal must be heated so that the filler metal can bond into the expanded( by heat) pores.

    I have not tried this with a benzomatic but can tell you it works quite ok with an oxy acetylene flame.all I can offer is once the brazing starts to flow remove the heat pronto!

    As the others have said ,it will only work well with the right cleaning and fluxing.

    Grahame

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    Something else to add to this conversation is that the Bernzomatic torch can be fueled either by Propane (blue cylinder) and Map-Pro gas (yellow cylinder). The advertising materials for Bernzomatic recommend Map-Pro gas.

    Map Pro should not be confused with Mapp gas which had a much higher calorific value but is no longer manufactured as it tended to explode cylinders and injure people. It was however really good for brazing.

    Also I would throw in in that I found uncoated rods much better to braze with. The uncoated brazing rods are of course used with a bottled powdered flux. The advantage was that the flux was still fresh (if the bottled was screwed up tight between uses), and that you could heat the metal slightly and add a pinch of powdered flux which would adhere and not be blown away by the flow (jet stream) of the flame.

    Once you got your powdered flux to stick and melt the deposited filler rod metal would flow exactly where you fluxed, just like magic.It would follow along the flame heated metal, keeping in the fluxed area.

    Grahame

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    In 'the old days' I understand a brazing hearth was used. A few firebricks to provide a bit of shield to keep the heat where it is needed..that might help..

    I don't think I'd recommend it but the old pressure blow lamps seemed to produce plenty of heat.



    Russ

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    Hi Russ
    It is still a recommended practice.
    You would not believe how much heat a steel bench will suck up.

    Grahame

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    I also have the TS8000. Brazed four cupped washers onto some 1" gal pipe a while ago to make some legs. Took quite a while to get enough heat into them to melt the flux coated rods. The pipe was about 200mm long so a lot of heat was being drawn away from the joint.
    Nev.

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    Quote Originally Posted by China View Post
    I gave up years ago playing around with Berznomatic and the like for brazing, it is just a frustrating waste of time, you may find that a silver solder will do what you require
    I can melt the bronze for the simple repairs I'm doing but will also try the silver solder as well - thanks

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    Thanks for the replies, I love the brazing technique, going to continue practicing and learning

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    Watch this video...

    How to bronze braze with LPG or butane gas

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGwKuYP-RNo

    This what I want to do but can't find the right torch!

  15. #15
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    Funnily enough, there were a few "antique" blow torches for sale this week or last at Grays....seemed to be stupid money already a few days out....seems bidders as usual had no idea of market price.

    Lpg torch will be a better temperature than those silly benzomatic things. Not really anything like that pistol grip torch in my arsenal, but the Primus I have for plumbing seems to produce a similar output and didn't cost over 200 bucks - several decades ago at least.

    I wouldn't like to do silver soldering with any of these things really. If you can put up with the kerosene stink, prepared to to clean the jet and no doubt replace the leather seal on the pump, an old blow torch can at least heat up a reasonable area. Personally, often found it an exercise in frustration still, wouldn't like to use a high copper concentration rod that's for sure!

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